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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
washington's national security agency spying on high priority israeli military targets in york times reported on nov third in a seven page article based on documents leaked by performer and as a contractor that were snowed in all the in depth overview the tales highly classified documents leaked by snowden they include document outlining the american intelligence agencies monitoring of israeli targets namely israel defense forces drone aircraft and israel's black sparrow missile system classified documents leaked to the report further confirm the reports of past cooperation between the nsa any of the idf signal intelligence unit eighty two under it would try clearly cheese raw materials ok my signals intelligence that is by spying. top obama administration officials have in the past praised israel's intelligence capabilities and express gratitude for receiving access to it. new york times report comes on the heels of our age in europe over the revelation that the us listen in on european leaders including capping german chancellor angela merkel cell phone last week us secretary of state john
an olive branch to the united states. last week the former national security agency contractor appealed for clemency and said he was ready to testify to congress about u.s. surveillance . but on sunday lawmakers flatly rejected his offer. , ife had an opportunity what he was was a whistleblower, to pick up the phone and call the house committee, the senate intelligence committee, and say, look, i have some information that i -- that you want to see. that did not happen. now he has done this in almost a service to our country. >> a view shared by the chairman of the house intelligence committee. >> he does need to own up to what he has done, and if he wants to talk through why he did those things, that would be the appropriate time and the appropriate way to do it. >> a white house adviser said snowden's, t request is not under investigation. snowden has been granted temporary asylum in russia, but there are growing calls for him to be given refuge in germany after he revealed claims that the nsa tapped the phone of chancellor angela merkel. pierre limiter -- p aaron a lemaitre hasre won
national security agency contractor, edward snowden, one former aide to the chancellor said that snowden has done the western world a great service and it's up to us to help him. today on "face the nation," rejecting the idea that snowden be granted any clemency. >> can he had an opportunity if what he was was a whistle blower to pick up the phone and call the house intelligence committee, the senate intelligence committee. that didn't happen. and now he's done this enormous disservice to our country and i think the answer is no clemency. >> a republican counterpart in the house also dismissed the idea. >> no, i don't see any reason. you know, we -- i wouldn't do that. >> the suspect in friday's fatal shooting of a tchl sa altsa age has been charged with murder. paul ciancia wrote a note indicating that he intended to die during the attack. he survived after being wounded by the police. >>> four prominent scientists, including james hansen, distributed a joint letter citing the need for nuclear power plants. they wrote renewables like wind and solar and biomass cannot scale up fast enoug
information at this time. >>> and google's executive chairman is lambing the national security agency. he says they allegedly spied on his company's data centers. telling the adjourn the allegations are outrageous, google has registered complaints with nsa, as well as president obama and members of congress. edward snowden said the agency broke into google and yahoo's information centers. >>> memberships of the gop are taking sides. as patty culhane shows us, an election in alabama defines the sides. >> omar gets to work, trying to define the soul of the renal party. he calls himself a true believer, his cause, teapt, the most conservative faction of the republican party. >> it will be a godly country, a country that god can look down on and say, i'm proud of this country but right now i don't think he's doing that. i don't think he's proud of the way we conducted business. >> he's campaigning outside the debate for this man candidate dean young, promising to change washington confrontation. >> i can tell you now that barack obama does not want me to go to washington because we don't have a lo
the director of the national security agency. but the congress people in the house intelligence committee were adamant they did not know anything about how we gather intelligence. >> i think that if you are's tapping the phone line of a foreign leader, and ally that is a significant intelligence activity that should be reported to the committee. >> i too want to just say that we need to do everything we can to insurance that our members get the information that we need. >> why did we not know that heads of states were being eaves dropped on, spied on. >> i thought we were bros. these folks in congress on the house intelligence committee are completely taken off guard but what-- maybe the access of american intelligence gathering and they invest ree right to be outraged and surprised. well, not every right, no right, they have no right. here's why. >> in 2001 congress passed the patriot act giving our intelligence agencies access to quote any tangible thing. that's the phrase that's in the patriot act. our nation's intelligence has to have access to everything exaccept-- except wishes and faire
charges. >> the head of the senate intelligence committee is defending the national security agency. the agency is facing the global criticism and claims that it spied on foreign allies. democratic senator dianne feinstein says that the end as a operate under direction of other departments. >> i believe s a is filled with a good patriotic people who want to do the right thing. they follow the orders that they are given. the administration controls intelligence. the national intelligence framework is put together by the administration. our priorities are ranked. as i understand it's a these are the priorities of one, terrorism, to, support of our military abroad. 3, nuclear counter proferation, 4, hard targets. and now cyber. those are the main areas. so essentially the end as a is told to do certain things and it does it. >> claims about the u.s. bond on allied leaders and citizens have sparked calls for the u.s. to roll back their surveillance programs. >> some parents in a sacramento suburb are fighting an elementary school policy that makes their children freeze at the end of a r
underway to identify the suspects. >>> new pictures are released of the former national security agency worker edward snowden, revelations that the nsa spied on germany's chancellor angela merkel have proadvocated outrage in the country. >>> french police have released a sketch of a man wanted for the murder of a family in the alps, a shooting that is still unexplained. >>> a dutch children's rights organization is warning of what it describes as an e epidemic of youngsters being forced to perform sexual acts. handed those names to interpol. >> she is the weapon against sex traffic, she is not real. prowling the web for sex, one group trying to end it all. these are some of the men who have been identified as terrorists. researchers log on to chattel rooms pretending to be young girls. within seconds they are being offered money in return for things we cannot repeat. >> whenever i open a chat room dozens of men swarm at me within minutes. from families, good jobs, they're athletes, it's unbelievable how diverse the pattern is. >> this is one of the chat rooms the team are using. 10 f ph
-kept secrets are out. by now, most of the world has heard the name edward snowden. the former national security agency contractor who released thousands of classified documents about government surveillance in one of the most significant leaks in u.s. history. he's been charged with espionage and has been living in russia under temporary asylum. the american journalist at the center of the story lives in brazil. >> we've had to come to rio to speak to glenn greenwald. he hasn't returned to the united states since he broke the story about the nsa surveillance programs for fear of being prosecuted. >> the nsa's goal really is the elimination of privacy globally. it is literally a system designed to monitor all forms of human behavior inside the united states, which is the ultimate surveillance state. >> last december, glenn greenwald received an email from a person who didn't identify himself. >> we still didn't know who he was, where he worked, but he was saying he had access to large amounts of very sensitive surveillance information that show the united states government was violating the law
by the documents you have gotten better from the national security agency. we have gone through some of the points. you begin with ban ki-moon last april. why don't you start there. >> i used to be with "the baltimoresun" and i wrote back in 1985 and can say i was not shocked about any of this, but i think perhaps one of the most interesting questions these documents raise is i refer to the agency as an omnivore. they're under pressure from policymakers, from the white house, see -- cia, dod to the state department to sort of the prepared to supply information on almost anything. inrisis breaks out tomorrow an unexpected place, and nsa is under heavy pressure to produce intelligence from that place. and that combined with a big- budget in secrecy has, i think, created what actually secretary of state john kerry was saying last week automatic pilot, sort to snatch upeffort any kind of electronic communication there is around the world. i thought the ban ki-moon example was interesting. thank you men, the secretary- general to the u.n., very -- bany to the u.s. -- a ki-moon, secretary-general to the
'll see. >> looking forward to it. sandra, thank you very much. >>> outrageous that the national security agency was looking between the google data centers. if that's true, the steps the organization was willing to do without good judgment and potentially violate people's privacy is not okay. >> he comes out swinging against the nsa for going a bit too far when it comes to all the spying stuff. never mind google has cooperated on a number of venture, now blasting the nsa for perhaps mining a bit too much far a. and why? possibly using google high tech data centers for all but steal users records. are they trying to cover their hiney? heather, you're giving mr. schmidt the benefit of the doubt. >> absolutely. what he gave the go. he h government he had to do by subpoena. he has filed a petition to have all the information -- >> so not just by cooperative remorse. >> he cooperated because he had no choice. the order under which the information was obtained was an executive order. >> at this point, i think that for google even to say that the nsa should not be mining this information, i thi
the national security agency's massive spying operation. according to "the washington post," the nsa secretly broke into the main communications links that connect yahoo! and google data centers around the world. and the italian media is reporting that the nsa spied as well on the vatican, spying on both pope benedict and pope francis. the nsa has now just issued an outright denial of the italian media reports. and unless you think the united states is alone in spying efforts, the russians are trying to keep up with us. russian operatives reportedly handing out goody bag to world leaders who were attending september's g-20 summit meeting. it turns out the russians were giving the delegates souvenir usb drives, phone chargers and teddy bears they had bugged. they bugged a teddy bear. who would have imagined? the russians deny the italian media report. joining us for more on benghazi and other foreign policy challenges facing the nation, general jack keen, retired four-star army general, former army vice chief of staff, fox news military analyst. general, great to have you with us. >> good to b
security agency tracked everyone's phone calls. in order to identify 300 suspects. we had to track according to the disclosures, 300 million people's activities. it doesn't seem right. it seems like overreach. over and over again this needs to be organized. there are legitimate uses of this. this is clearly overstep. in this particular case, we assume that there was monitoring between different computer systems. with enkrepgcryptioencryption. we can stop it. >> google is calling this overreach. you're clearly angry about this. >> we are. >> amanpour, they stake their reputations on the ability to safeguard information users here. there are a lot of people who are very upset with what they're learning. is this genuine here? is this genuine backlash we're hearing from world leaders and how this is going to impact our relationship with others? >> well, i think a lot of it is gen genuine. some of it they have to say these kinds of things because of the public outrage, the heard the google chairman say they were outraged and they've complained many times to the nsa, to congress to presi
by the idea that national security agency could be spying on them. the foreign intelligence surveillance act, all those things very much in question with regard to how google and nsa and everybody treats electronic data. >> the hour's top story and that is preet bharara firing a fresh warning saying that no institution is too big to jail. let's take a listen. >> greed, sometimes, is not good. and there are at least 75 convicted insider trading defendants who today would likely agree. but individual guilt is not the whole of our mission. sometimes blame worthy institutions need to be held accountable too. no institution should rest easy in the belief that it is too big to jail. >> something he has said before, dom, but you can't help, given the context, he's gone after now one of the largest hedge funds in the world, and basically supervised its dismantling, guilty pleas to five counts here, one wonders and he's got ongoing stuff with the biggest banks in the country. >> here's the interesting part about this. wasn't that long ago that goldman sachs got sued in the abby cas debt ffiasco, a $5
. >>anny: the head of the senate intelligence committee is defending the national security agency. democratic senator dianne feinstein said that the nsa operates under the direction of other departments. the agency has recently faced global criticism and claims it's like on foreign allies. >>: i believe the nsa is filled with good patriotic people who want to do the right thing. they follow the orders they are given. the administration controls intelligence. the national intelligence from markets put together by the administration. our priorities are right. as i understand it, these are the priorities. one, terrorism. two, support of our military abroad. 3, nuclear counter proliferation. for, our target in now, cyber. and those are the main areas. so essentially the nsa is told to do certain things and it doesn't. >>anny: claims of u.s. spying on allied leaders and citizens have sparked calls for the west to roll back its surveillance programs. president obama has ordered a review of those programs. >>james: no surprise here. a new poll finds over americans are against most propos
eric schmidt slamming the national security agency over its alleged spying activity. the tech honcho calling the alleged snooping of google's data centers as outrageous and potentially illegal if proven. "wall street journal" reporting that schmidt has filed complaints with the nsa, members of congress and the president. the nsa, meanwhile, maintains it conducts all of its activities in acor corps dance with the law insisting, quote: dennis: which is really grandstanding fr agency in so much hot water these days. cheryl: people over the weekend talking about the creation of the nsa and how this was never supposed to be -- dennis: spying on our allies and our allies spy on us, but i think that kind of finger wagging from an agency that's this controversial right now is especially confident. cheryl: i agree. long thought of as risky, adjustable rate mortgages, those things may be a huge help to homeowners. deb tennessee thank you, fed, for that. and help for veterans, high-tech training and a guaranteed job with a he hefty salary. details coming up. meantime, here's how the world's cur
.s. is revealing national security agency surveillance procedures to strike the right balance between security and privacy. his comments came at a news conference this afternoon. quick question on surveillance issues. significanten coverage overseas about u.s. surveillance practices. 80% ofderstand it, about the work that the nsa does is actually outside the u.s. and basically, an government -- not governed by statute. at whether those guidelines provide any protection for foreign nationals or whether there is sufficient protection? that any assurances can be given from this government? >> as the president has indicated, and he is totally right, we are in the process of conducting a review of the surveillance activities. to make sure that we are striking an appropriate balance between keeping the american people safe and our allies safe, and also guarding the civil liberties and privacy of those same people, who are in conversations with our partners in europe and other partners around the world to make sure that we strike the appropriate balance. there are some fundamental questions we have t
the head of the senate intelligence committee is defending the national security agency. a democratic senator dianne feinstein said that the nsa operates under the direction of other documents. -departments. ddt has recently faced a global criticism amid claims its fight on foreign allies. >>: i believe the nsa is filled with good patriotic people who want to do the right thing. they follow the orders they're given. the administration controls intelligence. the national intelligence from work is put together by the administration. our priorities are right. as i understand it these are the priorities are right. as i un[ male announcer ] some things are simply better at home. like the enticing aroma and distinctive taste of nespresso. elegant capsules meet masterfully crafted machines, and one touch creates the perfect coffee, cappuccino, and latte. ♪ tempt all your senses with one extraordinary coffee. [ penélope cruz ] nespresso. what else? [ male announcer ] discover the world of nespresso on grant avenue and nespresso-us.com. >>: could the morning. at times a 25. here's an update
if proven. >> it's really outrageous that the national security agency was looking between the google data centers if that's true. the steps that the organization was willing to do without good judgment to pursue its mission and potentially violate people's privacy is not okay. it's just not okay. so in that sense the snowden revelations have assisted us in understanding that. it's perfectly possible that there are more revelations to come. >> schmidt says that google has registered complaints with the nsa, president obama and members of congress. gentlemen, joe you were saying before there are two camps of people. >> here's what the nsa said. the nsa referred to some of the press articles treatmently that they had misstated facts and mischaraterized the nsa. this is definitive. unless they're lying, the nsa follows all of the laws, regulations and policies and assertions do a grave disservice to the nation, its allies and partners and the money who make up the nsa. >> i was in the antisnowden camp but something i read yesterday in "the new york times" gives me a little bit of pause. they
of the national student agency. patrick kelley was the acting general counsel for the federal. of investigation and brad -- brad wiegmann was a deputy assistant attorney general at the national security vision department of justice. there are allegations in the press last week that the nsa is secretly broken into main communication links that connect yahoo! and google data centers around the world. under something called project muscular which allows the nsa and the british intelligence agency government communications headquarters, or gchq to copy data flows across fiber optic cables to carry information among the data centers of these silicon valley companies. could the panel please explain what the program is about and what impact it has on the programs that are the subject of today's hearing which is to 15 and 702 program? >> i can't address the veracity or lack there of, the details of the article but i think it's worthwhile making a few general points for everybody. even by the terms of the article itself, there's no connection to the 702 or 215 programs that we are here to discuss. i wou
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)